Pockets

 

There are a variety of different kinds of pockets, some of which are more decorative than functional. A pocket can be sewn on like a patch, sewn in a seam or cut onto the fabric.

Patch pocket:

Patch pockets are very simple pockets, and as the name indicates, they are sewn on top of a fabric like a patch. The shape of a patch pocket can be rectangular, curved or tapered on the bottom corners. The pocket opening can be interfaced if needed, and it is recommended especially if the fabric is very thin and stretches easily.

  1. Finish the fabric edges.
  2. Interface pocket opening if needed.
  3. Option 1. Sew a hem on the pocket opening, for example so that you first fold 1 cm to the wrong side and then again 2 cm, press and stitch. The size of the hem can vary a lot depending on how the pocket should look. You can also replace the hem with a turnup.
  4. Option 2. Sew the top corners of the pocket; fold and press for example 1 cm of the pocket opening to the wrong side. Fold 2 cm of the edge, this time to the right side and stitch the folded part on the sides. Turn the fold right side out and press. If you want, you can stitch the hem from the right side close to the fold.
  5. Press the pocket seam allowances to wrong side.
  6. Place the pocket on the garment in the right spot. Pin or baste carefully.
  7. Stitch the pocket on, starting from one of the top corners; secure the opening with a horizontal stitch and stitch around the pocket, following the folded edge. Secure the second corner with a horizontal stitch. If you want and depending on the material, you can use thicker thread for stitching or make a double stitch.
  8. Press the pocket.

Patch Pocket

Patch pocket with pleats:

A pleat or pleats makes the pocket more unique. The size of a pleat can vary a lot. You can make an inverted pleat, box pleat or a formation of multiple small pleats. The pleat can remain open or it can be closed with a stitch.

  1. Finish the fabric edges.
  2. Interface the pocket opening if needed.
  3. Form the pleat/pleats according to the style.
  4. Sew or stitch the pleat/pleats the way you want.
  5. Continue and finish the pocket same way as a regular patch pocket.

Patch Pocket With Pleat

Patch pocket with flap:

You can sew a flap on a patch pocket but a flap can also be used in other kinds of pockets. The size and shape of a flap can vary. The flap consists of two pieces; the interfaced outer part and the lining. The lining is usually cut with the same pattern and of the same fabric, although it can also be made of lining material.

  1. Make the pocket the same way as a regular patch pocket.
  2. Interface outer piece of the flap.
  3. Pin and sew the flap and its lining, right sides together. Leave the upper edge open. In flaps with corners, sew 1-2 stitches across in the corners; this way the corner will become sharp. Trim the seam allowances and if needed, notch the seam allowances in the curves. Turn right side out and press.
  4. If you want, stitch the flap edge.
  5. Place the flap on the garment on top of the patch pocket, interfaced flap side against bodice so that the flap is pointing away from the pocket opening. Sew the flap on from the open edge.
  6. Fold the flap over the pocket and stitch close to the top fold so that seam allowances are hidden under the stitch.
  7. Press the flap.

Patch Pocket With Flap

The flap can also be sewn in a seam between two garment pieces, if the pocket is under the seam. In this case, make the flap according to the instructions above, but place it in between the two garment pieces, and sew on at the same time as the seam.

Patch pocket with a fake flap:

In a patch pocket with fake flap, the flap is stitched on top of the pocket and it continues right below the pocket opening. It will not cover the pocket like a regular flap.

  1. Finish the fabric edges.
  2. Interface the flap.
  3. Sew the flap on the pocket opening, the right side of the flap against the wrong side of the pocket. Press open and fold the flap on the right side of the pocket.
  4. Fold and press the seam allowances on bottom edge of the flap to wrong side and stitch the flap on, close to the fold. If you want and depending on the material, you can use thicker thread for stitching or use a double stitch.
  5. Finish the pocket same way as a regular patch pocket.

In-seam pocket:

Pocket sewn on a seam is clean looking, fairly simple to make and quite unnoticeable. You can also make the pocket with a flap.

  1. Finish the fabric edges.
  2. Sew the pocket’s facing on the smaller pocket bag, press the seam allowances open.
  3. Sew the side seams of the garment around the pocket opening and press the seam allowances open.
  4. Pin and sew the pocket bag with facing on the garment’s back part’s seam allowances right sides together, so that the pocket is set on the correct place and position.
  5. If you want, stitch the back edge of the pocket opening, about 5 mm from the edge so that you start from top with a horizontal stitch, then stitch along the pocket opening and finish in the bottom with a horizontal stitch.
  6. Pin the other pocket bag in its place onto the seam allowance of the garment’s front part. The right sides should be together so that the pocket is pointing towards the back part. Sew.
  7. Stitch the front edge of the pocket opening approximately 5 mm from the edge so that you start from the top with a horizontal stitch, then stitch along the pocket opening and finish at the bottom with a horizontal stitch. Fold the pocket bag towards the front part and press.
  8. Sew the pocket bags together.
  9. Press the pocket.

In-Seam Pocket

Welt pocket:

A welt pocket is usually made so that the pocket opening is cut into the bodice and finished with a welt. You can also make the welt pocket with a flap. This type of pocket construction is most common in coats and jackets. Size and shapes of welt pockets can vary a lot. When you are making a garment that has welt pockets, it is important to mark the welt opening on the bodice with a thread before removing the paper patterns from the pieces.

  1. Finish the edges of the pocket parts.
  2. Interface the outer side of the welt, the welt facing and the area in the bodice where the cut will be made.
  3. Fold the welt in half right sides together and sew the ends. Trim the corners, turn right side out and press.
  4. Draw the welt opening on the bodice with chalk using a ruler as a guide.
  5. Place the welt on the right side of the bodice, interfaced side against the bodice so that its open side is aligned with the center line of the welt opening.
  6. Sew the welt 7 mm from the edge, aligned with the edge of the welt opening, from corner to corner.
  7. Place the welt facing on the bodice on the other side of the pocket opening than the welt, right sides together. The shorter long side of the facing should be centered on the welt opening line.
  8. Sew the welt facing 7 mm from the edge, aligned with the edge of the welt opening, starting 5 mm after the first edge and finishing 5 mm before the other edge.
  9. Cut the pocket opening line with scissors from the first triangle’s tip until the second triangle’s tip. Cut the sides of the triangles 1 mm from the corners of the welt and welt facing. Be careful not to cut too close to stitches.
  10. Fold the welt towards the pocket opening and push the welt facing through the opening on the wrong side and press.
  11. Sew the smaller pocket bag onto the edge of the welt facing. Keep right sides together. Sew the bigger pocket bag onto the welt’s seam allowances. Keep the right side of the welt against the right side of the pocket bag. Press.
  12. Sew the pocket bags together.
  13. Stitch the short edges of the welt onto the bodice as far from the edges as you want. Make sure that the pocket is in the correct position before stitching.
  14. Press the pocket.