Slits & Cuffs

 

A cuff and vent makes it possible to make the bottom of the sleeve tight around the wrist. A closed cuff without a vent or buttons is looser, so that it is possible to put the hand through without opening the cuff. Purpose of a vent is to make the sleeve looser and facilitate the dressing, but it can also be decorative. The end of a vent is the point where the slit, placket or opening of a vent ends. The bottom of the sleeve can also be pleated or draped to create more fullness to the sleeve. Vents and pleats are placed on the side of the back sleeve and the pleats are folded towards the vent.

Sleeve vent with hems:

A vent with hems is the most simple way of making a vent at the bottom of a sleeve. Because of its light construction it is suitable for light and flowing materials.

Option 1. Vent in a seam:

Do not sew the seam onto which the hem will be sewn before making the hems.

  1. Fold the sides of the vent slit into thin, approximately 7 mm wide hems that narrow towards the end of vent. Press.
  2. Stitch the hems on the edge of the fold.
  3. Sew the sleeve seams so that you sew a little bit over the ends of the hems. Press the seam open.
  4. Press the vent.

Option 2. Vent cut into bottom of the sleeve:

  1. Cut the vent slit according to the line marked in the pattern.
  2. Fold the edges of the vent into thin, approximately 7 mm wide hems that narrow towards the end of vent. Press.
  3. Stitch the hems on the edge of the fold.
  4. Sew the end of the vent by folding the ends of the vent in middle, right sides together. Sew a short seam that continues smoothly to the fold.
  5. Press the vent.

Vent with a placket:

A vent with a placket is made with a separate panel of fabric that is called a placket. The tip of a placket can be rectangular, sharp, diagonal or round. The placket will overlap with the other edge of the vent and hide the slit.

  1. Cut the vent slit according to the line marked in the pattern.
  2. Fold the edge of the slit that is on the back sleeve’s side, into a thin, approximately 7 mm wide hem that narrows towards the end of vent. Press.
  3. Stitch the hem on the edge of the fold.
  4. Fold the placket in the middle and press all but the shorter long side’s seam allowances to the wrong side.
  5. Place the shorter, unfolded long side of the placket on the slit, on front sleeve’s side so that the right side of the placket is against the wrong side of the sleeve.
  6. Sew the placket on.
  7. Fold the placket to the right side of the sleeve and place the other long side above the recently sewn seam so that the seam is hidden. Close vent to check whether it fits well and pin or baste the placket carefully.
  8. Stitch the placket on starting from the end of the vent with a horizontal stitch and continue following the edge around the top corner until the bottom of the sleeve.
  9. If you want, you can make another stitch next to the first one.
  10. Press the vent.

Cuff:

A cuff gives the bottom of the sleeve a nicer form and a more finished look. The edges of a cuff can be sharp, round or diagonal. The width of a cuff varies depending on the style.

Option 1. Cuff without a vent:

  1. Interface cuff.
  2. Prepare the sleeve and any possible pleats.
  3. Sew the ends of the cuff together, right sides against each other and press open.
  4. Fold and press the cuff in middle wrong sides together. Press the inner side’s seam allowances to the wrong side.
  5. Place the cuff’s unfolded edge on the bottom of the sleeve right sides together, sew it on and press seam allowances towards the cuff.
  6. Place the cuff’s folded edge on the wrong side of the bottom of the sleeve, on top of the seam.
  7. Stitch the back side of the cuff on from right side along the join seam or on the edge of the join.
  8. If you want you can also stitch outer edge of the cuff with one or several stitches.
  9. Press the cuff.

Option 2. Cuff with a vent:

  1. Interface cuff.
  2. Prepare sleeve, vent and any possible pleats.
  3. Press the seam allowances of the cuff’s inner side to wrong side.
  4. Fold the cuff in the middle according to the notches, right sides together. Sew the ends. Trim the seam allowances in the corners, turn right side out and press.
  5. Place the cuff’s unfolded edge on the bottom of the sleeve, right sides together so that the edge of the cuff comes one millimeter further than the edge of the sleeve.
  6. Sew the cuff on and press seam allowances towards the cuff.
  7. Place the folded edge of the cuff on the wrong side of the bottom of the sleeve, on top of the seam.
  8. Stitch the back side of the cuff on from right side along the join seam or on the edge of the join.
  9. If you want you can also stitch the cuff’s outer edge with one or several stitches.
  10. Press the cuff.

Button stands:

Button through is one way of fastening a piece of clothing. A button through can be made in several different ways and usually in women’s clothing the buttonholes are placed on the right side of the closure and the buttons on left side. In men’s clothing buttons and buttonholes are the opposite way.

Button stand folded from bodice:

A button stand that is folded from the bodice is the simplest way to make a button through. There are many variations of this technique and the button panel can be folded to either the right or wrong side. When folded to the right side, the wrong side of the fabric will we visible on the front side, which makes it impossible to use this construction on fabrics that are different on the right and wrong sides.

  1. Interface the button stand so that you leave the seam allowance without interfacing. If the button stand will be folded to the right side, interface the right side of the bodice. If the button stand will be folded to the wrong side, interface the wrong side of the fabric.
  2. Fold and press the seam allowances to the interfaced side. Fold the button stand to the same direction. Press and stitch from the edge of the button stand.
  3. If you want you can also stitch the button stand’s outer edge.
  4. Sew and stitch the other button stand the same way.
  5. Press the button stands.

button stand

Button stand with a separate panel:

Button stand with a separate panel looks similar to the button stand that is folded from the bodice. This kind of construction can be used e.g. when the wrong side of the fabric is different from the right side,and it is not possible to fold the button stand to the wrong side.

  1. Interface the button stand.
  2. Sew the panel on the garment’s front edge so that the right side of the panel is against the back side of the bodice. Fold and press the panel to the right side.
  3. Stitch from the edge of the button stand.
  4. Fold and press the seam allowances of the panel’s open side to the wrong side, press and stitch the panel on from the fold.
  5. Sew and stitch the other button stand the same way.
  6. Press the button stand.